Pakistan Vs England Pre Match Analysis. 

Where: Trent Bridge, Nottingham.
Fourth Day into the world cup and alot of action is going on. Yesterday, Bangladesh won a memorable world cup match against South Africa. It was probably the first upset of the tournment. Today it is another big match. It is between the most unpredictable side versus the number one ODI side in the world. Before the start of the world cup both teams played an ODI series for the world cup preparation. Although the wickets were flats but it should have give a fair amount of idea against each other. England won its first match beating South Africa while Pakistan being Pakistan lose miserably to West Indies.

Image result for Trent Bridge, Nottingham
For Pakistan, the time for chaos, panic, recriminations and reckoning that follows most World Cup campaign feels it's drawing ever-nearer. The first game of the tournament for them was Pakistan at their worst: weak, seemingly ill-prepared, timid and gormless. It was one of the bleakest days in the history of Pakistan at the World Cup - and make no mistake, Pakistan have had plenty of those. Their surrender in the face of a short bowling barrage from West Indies means they can expect much the same against England, whose bowlers will keep them on the back foot so long they might bruise their Achilles heels. The short ball continue to hurt pakistan as the batsman don't know how to tackle it. The only positive thing for them is the return of Muhammad Amir in the wicket taking form. He took 3 wickets against West Indies. Given the preparations and the time given to them in the English conditions is quite contradicting to what happened so for in the tournment. They have to step up and show their A game as chances are running out and Lahore seems to be more closer than London in this situation. 
For Pakistan, the time for chaos, panic, recriminations and reckoning that follows most World Cup campaign feels it's drawing ever-nearer. The first game of the tournament for them was Pakistan at their worst: weak, seemingly ill-prepared, timid and gormless. It was one of the bleakest days in the history of Pakistan at the World Cup - and make no mistake, Pakistan have had plenty of those. Their surrender in the face of a short bowling barrage from West Indies means they can expect much the same against England, whose bowlers will keep them on the back foot so long they might bruise their Achilles heels.
These two sides played each other in a five-match series just last month, and while England won 4-0, there was no sign of the Pakistan that showed up against West Indies. Indeed, it was the sort of series defeat that allowed Pakistan plenty of positives. They scored above 340 three times out of four against that England attack, and most top-order batsmen got runs. So if the West Indies game was Pakistan at their worst, they can only improve. Pakistan believe they are much closer to the team that almost beat England in two of the four completed games. That was only a fortnight ago, but given what's happened since, it doesn't feel as recent.
In times like these, the onus falls on players of established, undisputed quality. Among their batting ranks, Pakistan can only name one player to fit that bill. Babar Azam has effortlessly become the leader of the batting line-up, and with numbers like his in a team that has long cried out for a successor to Inzamam, Mohammad Yousaf and Younis Khan, it's hardly a surprise. Two fifties and a hundred in the recent series against England means he has form - Babar always has form. And when an entire side, as Pakistan do now, look to have been technically exposed by one simple plan, it is Babar who must step up and establish that the West Indies game was an aberration. He must also do it at a strike rate that has a chance of challenging England; his 112-ball 115 at this venue a fortnight ago copped criticism for being too slow against a team like England.
England's progress continues to be so eerily serene the natural pessimists who followed their cricket in the 1990s feel sure something will come unstuck along the line. And yet if fate has that cruel twist in store for them, it's hiding it exceptionally well. The first game was as emblematic of England's evolution in ODI cricket as any contest has been in the four years since this Eoin Morgan-led team became a world force, the pressure of the big occasion barely registering as they brushed aside South Africa. When Jonny Bairstow was removed for a golden duck, there was no alarm; four batsmen scored half-centuries to cover for the failure. Of course, the bowlers and fielders backed them up, almost erasing that little blip from memory. They are dominant side and playing some fearless cricket for a time. They are going to Smash every team from ball one. They are tournment favourites and with their performance they are showing it to every one. Surely they'll go hard at pakistan as well but they seems to havr struggled in the past when their top four didn't performed well. It is the thing they should need to address otherwise they are the team to beat in this event. 
Pitch and conditions.
It rained heavily the day before the game, but the clouds are expected to clear for match day. The pitch - the same one on which England have twice broken the record for highest ODI score, most recently reaching 481 for 6 against Australia last year - is expected to be especially flat, but Morgan insisted it was quite different to that wicket in how it was expected to behave.
What to expect: 
The match will be played on the same pitch England scored 481 for six against Australia last year and, against Pakistan in 2016, amassed 444 for three. Trent Bridge is the haunted house for bowlers and, just as in all horror films, they can't help but go back.