Magnetic particles that 'crush' bacteria

Magnetic particles that 'crush' bacteria

Magnetic particles that 'crush' bacteria

Sydney: Bacteria and germs pose major deadly threats to humanity. Our pharmaceuticals have been ineffective and newer antibiotics are needed in the face of stagnant bacteria, but preparation of new antibiotics requires a lot of time, investment and effort.

A team from Australia's RMIT University has actually researched and attacked bacteria. For this, scientists have created nanoparticles (particles) of magnetic and metallic liquid. When such particles are placed in a light magnetic field, nanoparticles of liquid metal change their shape and their edges become sharp. Now they are so fine that bacteria, like a spider, are able to get punctured.

 
In the lab, it was tested on a bacterial catheter (bio-film), and in just 90 minutes the particles destroyed 99% of the bacteria. It killed all types of bacteria and did not harm human cells.

The lead author of the research, Aaron Alborne, says that bacteria are becoming stronger in the chemical process and there is no other way but to attack and kill them.

Scientist Aaron said, "We have made metal ores in such a way that they break the bacterium's biofilm and prevent them from growing further. If it gets any more success then the antibiotics will talk about resistance. '

 
This technique can be used to protect medical pills and devices from bacteria by turning them into sprays. It is also likely that success will lead to fungal infections, elimination of cholesterol from the body, and elimination of cancer.